Calvinism

  • The sovereignty of God, by John Murray
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  • Calvin's Institutes (This is a .zip file)
  • I found this help file somewhere on the net. Thanks to whoever is the author of it!

     

  • The Plan of Salvation, by Charles Hodge
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  • God's Foreknowledge and Free-Will, by Stephen Charnock
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  • Adam's Fall and Free-will, by R. L. Dabney
  • In this excerpt from Lecture 27 of Dabney's Systemic Theology, Dabney answers the very difficult question, If Adam was created perfect, with a holy will, then how could he choose to sin? The Arminians superficially assert because Adam had a free-will, and that, for them, is a satisfactory explanation. The Calvinist, however, has a more difficult time with this question, as Dabney unashamedly   points out. In fact, Dabney marvels at the fact that Arminians have not made more of it in there arguments against Calvinist. Dabney writes: "If the evil dispositions of a fallen sinner so determine his volitions as to ensure that he will not choose spiritual good, why did not the holy dispositions of Adam and Satan ensure that they would never have a volition spiritually evil? And if they somehow chose sin, contrary to their prevalent bent, why may not depraved man sometime choose good?"

     

  • The Offer of the Gospel, by Charles Hodge
  • "The Apostles, therefore, when they went forth in the execution of the commission which they had received, preached the gospel to every class of men, and assured every man whom they addressed, that if he would repent and believe in the Lord Jesus Christ he should be saved. If, therefore, any one holds any view of the decrees of God, or of the satisfaction of Christ, or of any other Scriptural doctrine, which hampers him in making this general offer of the gospel, he may be sure that his views or his logical processes are wrong. The Apostles were not thus hampered, and we act under the commission given to them."

     

  • Common Grace, by Louis Berkhof
  • "It should be emphasized that these natural blessings are manifestations of the grace of God to man in general. Some prefer to say that they are expressions of His goodness, kindness, benevolence, mercy, or longsuffering, but seem to forget that He could not be good, kind, or benevolent to the sinner unless He were first of all gracious."

     

  • The Five Points of Calvinism, by R. L. Dabney
  • "We Presbyterians care very little about the name Calvinism. We are not ashamed of it; but we are not bound to it. Some opponents seem to harbor the ridiculous notion that this set of doctrines was the new invention of the Frenchman John Calvin. They would represent us as in this thing followers of him instead of followers of the Bible. This is a stupid historical error." Also available in a PDF file for download. Dabney expounds the Doctrines of Grace in a very easy, and clear manner. I consider it one of the best works available on the topic.

     

  • Original Sin, by Michael Bremmer
  • If God created man and woman, then why do all men and women sin? Why do all die? How can death and sin by part of God's creation? The doctrines of the fall of man and original sin answer these questions.

     

  • Unconditional Election, by Michael Bremmer
  • "You will say to me then, 'Why does He still find fault? For who resists His will?'" Romans 9:19."The doctrine of unconditional election is subjected to the same objections as Paul's teaching on election in Rom. 9. If the apostle Paul is teaching something other than the unconditional election of sinners unto salvation, then those who listened to his teaching would not have objected that his view of election was unjust. Would anyone object, for instance, to the doctrine of election if all that Paul meant is that God elected the Church? Or that God elected nations to particular blessings? Not likely. Would anyone honestly object if what Paul is saying in Rom. 9 is that God elected those whom He foresaw would believe and persevere? Certainly not! We like these views of election! "

     

  • Particular Redemption, by Michael Bremmer
  • There are only three positions  possible regarding the extent of the atonement: (a) Jesus died for the sins of all people, (b) Jesus died for all the sins of some people, (c) Jesus died for some sins of all people. Now, if position c is correct, then all are still in their sins. If position a is correct, then why are all not saved? If the answer is because of unbelief, we ask: Is not unbelief a sin for which Christ died to atone (Jn.17.9)? If Christ died for the sin of unbelief for all people, then why are people punished for the sin of unbelief? The only consistent position is b, for it satisfies both reason and experience.

     

  • Efficacious Grace, by Loraine Boettner
  • "This effectual call is of God's free and special grace alone, not from any thing at all foreseen in man, who is altogether passive therein, until, being quickened and renewed by the Holy Spirit, he is thereby enabled to answer this call, and to embrace the grace offered and conveyed by it."

     

  • The Perseverance of the Saints, by Michael Bremmer
  • "Now to Him who is able to keep you from stumbling, and to make you stand in the presence of His glory blameless with great joy" (Jude 24).

     

  • Supralapsarian and Sublapsarian, by R. L. Dabney
  • "All who call themselves Calvinist admit that God's decree is, in his mind, a contemporaneous unit. Yet the attempt to assign an order to its relative parts, has led to three schemes of predestination: that of the Supralapsarian, of the Sublapsarian, and of the hypothetic Universalist."

     

  • Does God Love All People? by R. L. Dabney
  • "God consistently reveals the principle of compassion as to those whom, for wise reasons, He is determined not to save. We know that God's omnipotence surely accomplishes every purpose of His grace. Hence, we know that He did not purposely design Christ's sacrifice to effect the redemption of any others than the elect. But we hold it perfectly consistent with this truth, that the expiation of Christ for sin -- expiation of infinite value and universal fitness -- should be held forth to the whole world, elect and non-elect, as a manifestation of the benevolence of God's nature."

     

  • On Freedom of the Will, by Jonathan Edwards
  • The best work ever written on the subject of Free will.

     

  • Calvinism As An Evangelizing Force by N. S. McFetridge
  • "Has Calvinism, as compared with other systems of religious doctrine, shown itself to have been a power in the evangelization of the world? This is the most important question connected with any system of belief. All other questions are, in every Christian's opinion, subordinate to this. To save sinners and convert the world to a practical godliness must be the chief, the first and last, aim of every system of religion. If it does not respond to this, it must be set aside, however popular it may be."

     

  • Calvin On Free Will
  • "If any one will dispute with God, and endeavor to evade his judgment, by pretending that he could not have done otherwise, the answer already given is sufficient, that it is owing not to creation, but the corruption of nature, that man has become the slave of sin, and can will nothing but evil."

     

  • The Death of Death, by John Owen
  • The best work ever written on the subject of limited atonement (particular redemption).

     

  • God Has a Plan, by Loraine Boettner
  • "If God had not foreordained the course of events but waited until some undetermined condition was or was not fulfilled, His decrees could be neither eternal nor immutable. We know, however, that He is incapable of mistake, and that He cannot be surprised by any unforeseen inconveniences. His kingdom is in the heavens and He rules over all. His plan must, therefore, include every event in the entire sweep of history."

     

  • The Sovereignty of God, by Loraine Boettner
  • "It has been recognized by Christians in all ages that God is the Creator and Ruler of the universe, and that as the Creator and Ruler of the universe He is the ultimate source of all the power that is found in the creatures. Hence nothing can come to pass apart from His sovereign will;"

     

  • The Providence of God, by Loraine Boettner
  • "The Scriptures very clearly teach that all things outside of God owe not merely their original creation, but their continued existence, with all their properties and Powers, to the will of God."

     

  • The Foreknowledge of God, by Loraine Boettner
  • "To deny God the perfections of foreknowledge and immutability is to represent Him as a disappointed and unhappy being who is often checkmated and defeated by His creatures. But who can really believe that in the presence of man the Great Jehovah must sit waiting, inquiring, "What will he do?""

     

  • Outline of Systems, by Loraine Boettner
  • There are really only three systems which claim to set forth a way of salvation through Christ. They are: Universalism, Arminianism and Calvinism.

     

  • Total Inability, by Loraine Boettner
  • "Man, by his fall Into a state of sin, hath wholly lost all ability of will to any spiritual good accompanying salvation; so as a natural man, being altogether averse from good, and dead in sin, is not able, by his own strength, to convert himself, or to prepare himself thereunto."

     

  • Unconditional Election, by Loraine Boettner
  • "He chose us in Him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blemish before Him in love; having foreordained us unto adoption as sons through Jesus Christ unto Himself, according to the good pleasure of His will," (Eph. 1:4, 5)

     

  • Limited Atonement, by Loraine Boettner
  • "If from eternity God has planned to save one portion of the human race and not another, it seems to be a contradiction to say that His work has equal reference to both portions, or that He sent His Son to die for those whom He had predetermined not to save, as truly as, and in the same sense that He was sent to die for those whom He had chosen for salvation. These two doctrines must stand or fall together. We cannot logically accept one and reject the other. If God has elected some and not others to eternal life, then plainly the primary purpose of Christ's work was to redeem the elect."

     

  • The Perseverance of the Saint, by Boettner
  • "Those who have fled to Jesus for refuge have a firm foundation upon which to build. Though floods of error deluge the land, though Satan raise all the powers of earth and all the iniquities of their own hearts against them, they shall never fail; but, persevering to the end, they shall inherit those mansions which have been prepared for them from the foundation of the world. The saints in heaven are happier but no more secure than are true believers here in this world."

     

  • The Sovereignty God and Human Freewill, by Michael Bremmer
  • "We like God reigning in a universal way, as in keeping hurricanes out to sea, or keeping the planets in their fixed orbits. We especially like God keeping traffic moving smoothly as we go to work. In these situations, we endure God on His throne, and if He obediently sits on this throne, built by our egocentric imaginations, we will lift holy hands singing, "Our God Reigns!""

     

  • God's Sovereignty and the Human Will, By A. W. Pink
  • The popular idea now prevailing, and which is taught from the great majority of pulpits, is that man has a "free will," and that salvation comes to the sinner through his will co-operating with the Holy Spirit. To deny the "free will" of man, i.e. his power to choose that which is good, his native ability to accept Christ, is to bring one into disfavor at once, even before most of the those who profess to be orthodox. And yet Scripture emphatically says, "It is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that showeth mercy" (Rom. 9:16).

     

  • Reprobation, by Jerome Zanchius
  • Did God, from all eternity, decree to leave some of Adam's fallen posterity in their sins, and to exclude them from Christ and His benefits?

     

  • Is Calvinism Inconsistent with Freewill? by Loraine Boettner
  • "It is, of course, admitted by all that a person's acts must be without compulsion and in accordance with his own desires and inclinations, or he cannot be held responsible for them. If the acts of a free agent are in their very nature contingent and uncertain, then it is plain that foreordination and free agency are inconsistent."

     

  • A Reply to John Wesley
  • "For some time before, and especially since my last departure from England, both in public and private, by preaching and printing, you have been propagating the doctrine of universal redemption. And when I remember how Paul reproved Peter for his dissimulation, I fear I have been sinfully silent too long. O then be not angry with me, dear and honoured Sir, if now I deliver my soul, by telling you that I think in this you greatly err." --George Whitefield

     

  • Arminian Theory of Redemption, by Dabney
  • The Arminian objects . . . that our doctrine represents man as dragged reluctantly into a state of grace, like an angry wild beast into a cage; whereas, freedom of will, and hearty concurrence are essential elements of all service acceptable to God. The answer is, that the sinner's will is the very subject of this invincible grace. God so renews it that it neither can resist, nor longer wishes to resist.

     

  • Calvin On Election
  • The covenant of life is not preached equally to all, and among those to whom it is preached, does not always meet with the same reception. This diversity displays the unsearchable depth of the divine judgment, and is without doubt subordinate to God's purpose of eternal election.

     

  • The Plan of Salvation, by B. B. Warfield
  • THE SUBJECT to which our attention is to be directed in this series of lectures is ordinarily spoken of as "The Plan of Salvation." Its more technical designation is, "The Order of Decrees." And this technical designation has the advantage over the more popular one, of more accurately defining the scope of the subject matter. This is not commonly confined to the process of salvation itself but is generally made to include the entire course of the divine dealing with man which ends in his salvation. Creation is not uncommonly comprehended in it, and of course the fall, and the condition of man brought about by the fall. This portion of the subject matter may, however, certainly with some propriety, be looked upon as rather of the nature of a presupposition, than as a substantive part of the subject matter itself; and no great harm will be done if we abide by the more popular designation. Its greater concreteness gives it an advantage which should not be accounted small; and above all it has the merit of throwing into emphasis the main matter, salvation. The series of the divine activities which are brought into consideration are in any event supposed to circle around as their center, and to have as their proximate goal, the salvation of sinful man. When the implications of this are fairly considered it may not seem to require much argument to justify the designation of the whole by the term, "The Plan of Salvation."

     

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